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Hydrangea (Hydrangea arborescens L.)

Alternate Title

  • Hydrangea arborescens L.

Related Terms

  • Alkaloids, anthocyanins, caffeoylquinic acid, common Hydrangea, French hydrangea, glucosylcyanidin anthocyanins, glucosyldelphinidin, guilder rose, H. hortensia, hydragenol, Hydrangea arborescens, Hydrangea arborescens L., Hydrangea ashei Harbison, Hydrangea cinerea, hydrangea extract, Hydrangea macrophylla, Hydrangea macrophylla Thunb., Hydrangea paniculata Sieb., Hydrangea quercifolia Bart, Hydrangea radiata Walt., Hydrangea vulgaris, Hydrangea xanthoneura, Hydrangeaceae (family), Hydrangeae Dulcis Folium, hydrangeaic acid, hydrangenol, hydrangeol, hydrangin, mountain hydrangea, oakleaf hydrangea, panicled hydrangea, seven barks, silverleaf hydrangea, small ashy hydrangea, smooth hydrangea, wild hydrangea.

Background

  • Hydrangea is an ornamental plant native to North and South America and eastern and southern Asia. It has been used for the treatment of urinary tract disorders in traditional Chinese medicine and by the Cherokee tribe of North America.
  • Preliminary study has investigated hydrangea for its potential antifungal, antimalarial, and blood sugar-lowering properties. When applied to the skin, hydrangea may prevent male pattern baldness.
  • There is currently not enough human evidence available to support the use of hydrangea for any indication.

Evidence Table

    Disclaimer

    These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

*Key to grades:

Tradition

    Disclaimer

    The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Dosing

    Disclaimer

    The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

  • Adults (18 years and older)

    • Hydrangea has been consumed as a powdered herb, liquid extract, syrup, tincture, and tea. Doses have included 2 to 4 grams dried hydrangea rhizome and root three times per day; 2 to 4 milliliters hydrangea liquid extract three times per day; 1 teaspoon hydrangea syrup three times per day; 2 to 10 milliliters hydrangea tincture three times per day; and 2 to 4 grams dried hydrangea rhizome and root steeped in 150 milliliters boiling water for 5 to 10 minutes three times per day.
  • Children (under 18 years old)

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose for hydrangea, and use in children is not recommended.

Safety

    Disclaimer

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

  • Allergies

    • Avoid with known allergy or hypersensitivity to hydrangea. Symptoms of allergic reaction include rash, eczema, and inflammation.
  • Side Effects and Warnings

    • Hydrangea may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised in patients with diabetes or low blood sugar or in those taking drugs, herbs, or supplements that affect blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may need to be monitored by a qualified healthcare professional and medication adjustments may be necessary.
    • Hydrangea may cause dizziness and chest tightness. Use with caution in people with gastrointestinal disorders.
  • Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

    • Hydrangea is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

    Disclaimer

    Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

  • Interactions with Drugs

    • Hydrangea may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using medications that may also lower blood sugar. Patients taking drugs for diabetes by mouth or injection should be monitored closely by a qualified healthcare professional. Medication adjustments may be necessary.
    • Hydrangea may add to the effects of antifungal, anti-malarial, antihistamine, and cholesterol-lowering drugs, and drugs taken to prevent hair loss.
  • Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

    • Hydrangea may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.
    • Hydrangea may add to the effects of herbs and supplements with antifungal, antihistamine, anti-malarial, and cholesterol-lowering effects, and herbs and supplements taken to prevent hair loss.

Attribution

  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration ().

Bibliography

    Disclaimer

    Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to . Selected references are listed below.

  • Avenel-Audran M, Hausen BM, le Sellin J, et al. Allergic contact dermatitis from hydrangea–is it so rare? Contact Dermatitis 2000;43(4):189-191.
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  • Bruynzeel DP. Contact dermatitis from hydrangea. Contact Dermatitis 1991;24(1):78.
    View Abstract
  • Bruynzeel DP, Hausen BM. Allergic contact dermatitis to hydrangea. Contact Dermatitis 1987;16(3):181.
    View Abstract
  • Bruynzeel DP. Allergic contact dermatitis to hydrangea. Contact Dermatitis 1986;14(2):128.
    View Abstract
  • De Rooij J, Bruynzeel DP, Rustemeyer T. Occupational allergic contact dermatitis from hydrangea. Contact Dermatitis 2006;54(1):65-66.
    View Abstract
  • Ishih A, Miyase T, Terada M. Comparison of antimalarial activity of the alkaloidal fraction of Hydrangea macrophylla var. Otaksa leaves with the hot-water extract in ICR mice infected with Plasmodium yoelii 17 XL. Phytother Res. 2003;17(6):633-639.
    View Abstract
  • Kikuchi M, Kakuda R, Kikuchi M, et al. Three new glycosides from the leaves of Hydrangea macrophylla subsp. serrata (THUNB.) MAKINO. Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo) 2008;56(4):610-611.
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  • Kuligowski ME, Chang A, Leemreize JH. Allergic contact hand dermatitis from hydrangea: report of a 10th case. Contact Dermatitis 1992;26(4):269-270.
    View Abstract
  • Matsuda H, Wang Q, Matsuhira K, et al. Inhibitory effects of thunberginols A and B isolated from Hydrangeae Dulcis Folium on mRNA expression of cytokines and on activation of activator protein-1 in RBL-2H3 cells. Phytomedicine. 2008;15(3):177-184.
    View Abstract
  • Meijer P, Coenraads PJ, Hausen BM. Allergic contact dermatitis from hydrangea. Contact Dermatitis 1990;23(1):59-60.
    View Abstract
  • Rademaker M. Occupational contact dermatitis to hydrangea. Australas J Dermatol. 2003;44(3):220-221.
    View Abstract
  • Tsuji Y, Denda S, Soma T, et al. A potential suppressor of TGF-beta delays catagen progression in hair follicles. J Investig Dermatol Symp Proc. 2003;8(1):65-68.
    View Abstract
  • Yang Q, Gong ZZ. Purification and characterization of an ethylene-induced antifungal protein from leaves of guilder rose (Hydrangea macrophylla). Protein Expr Purif. 2002;24(1):76-82.
    View Abstract
  • Yoshida K, Ito D, Shinkai Y, et al. Change of color and components in sepals of chameleon hydrangea during maturation and senescence. Phytochemistry 4-16-2008;
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  • Zhang H, Matsuda H, Kumahara A, et al. New type of anti-diabetic compounds from the processed leaves of Hydrangea macrophylla var. thunbergii (Hydrangeae Dulcis Folium). Bioorg Med Chem Lett. 9-1-2007;17(17):4972-4976.
    View Abstract