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English ivy (Hedera helix)

Alternate Title

  • Hedera helix

Related Terms

  • Araliaceae (family), common ivy, dried ivy leaves, gum ivy, Hedera helix L., Hedera helix leaf extract, Hedera helix ssp. Canariensis Willd., true ivy, variegated ivy, woodbind.
  • Note: Hedera helix (English ivy) should not be confused with Glechoma hederacea (ground ivy), although the species have similar common names.

Background

  • English ivy (Hedera helix) is native to most of Europe and southwest Asia. Although it is often used as a landscaping groundcover in the United States, it is also an invasive species that is considered a noxious weed in some areas.
  • Based on preliminary animal studies, English ivy leaf extract may have antimutagenic (anticancer) and antioxidant properties. In addition, it may also be beneficial for children with asthma or adults with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, more research is needed in all of these areas to assess English ivy’s potential benefits.

Evidence Table

    Disclaimer

    These uses have been tested in humans or animals. Safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider.

    C Asthma

    Currently, there is insufficient available information to recommend for or against the use of English ivy in treating children with asthma. Additional study is needed in this area.

    C Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Currently, there is insufficient available information to recommend for or against the use of English ivy in treating chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Additional study is needed in this area.

*Key to grades:

Tradition

    Disclaimer

    The below uses are based on tradition, scientific theories, or limited research. They often have not been thoroughly tested in humans, and safety and effectiveness have not always been proven. Some of these conditions are potentially serious, and should be evaluated by a qualified healthcare provider. There may be other proposed uses that are not listed below.

Dosing

    Disclaimer

    The below doses are based on scientific research, publications, traditional use, or expert opinion. Many herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested, and safety and effectiveness may not be proven. Brands may be made differently, with variable ingredients, even within the same brand. The below doses may not apply to all products. You should read product labels, and discuss doses with a qualified healthcare provider before starting therapy.

  • Adults (18 years and older):

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose for English ivy.
  • Children (younger than 18 years):

    • There is no proven safe or effective dose for English ivy in children.

Safety

    Disclaimer

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration does not strictly regulate herbs and supplements. There is no guarantee of strength, purity or safety of products, and effects may vary. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy. Consult a healthcare provider immediately if you experience side effects.

  • Allergies

    • Avoid in individuals with a known allergy or hypersensitivity to English ivy (Hedera helix) or its constituents. Crossreaction or cross-senstivity has been noted between Hedera helix and Dendropanax trifidus, Schefflera arboricola, dandelion (Taraxacum officinale), false ragweed (Ambrosia acanthicarpa), giant ragweed (Ambrosia trifida), short ragweed (Ambrosia artemisifolia), sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata), wild feverfew (Parthenium hysterophorus), yarrow (Achillea millifolium), and tansy (Tanacetum vulgare), and some Dahlia species.
  • Side Effects and Warnings

    • The most frequently reported adverse effects related to English ivy are allergy symptoms, such as allergic contact dermatitis, asthmatic bronchitis, or allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (inflammation of the lining of the nose and the mucous membrane that covers the front of the eye and lines the eyelids). Gardeners and those with frequent exposure to English ivy may have a high risk of sensitization and should wear appropriate protective clothing.
    • Use cautiously in patients with cancer or taking antineoplastic (anticancer) agents.
  • Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

    • English ivy is not recommended in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

Interactions

    Disclaimer

    Most herbs and supplements have not been thoroughly tested for interactions with other herbs, supplements, drugs, or foods. The interactions listed below are based on reports in scientific publications, laboratory experiments, or traditional use. You should always read product labels. If you have a medical condition, or are taking other drugs, herbs, or supplements, you should speak with a qualified healthcare provider before starting a new therapy.

  • Interactions with Drugs

    • Although not well studied in humans, English ivy may have antimutagenic (anticancer) properties. Caution is advised when combining English ivy with other anticancer agents.
    • English ivy may have antioxidant activity. Although not well studied in humans, combined use of English ivy and antioxidants may have additive effects.
  • Interactions with Herbs and Dietary Supplements

    • Although not well studied in humans, English ivy may have antimutagenic (anticancer) properties. Caution is advised when combining English ivy with other anticancer herbs or supplements.
    • English ivy may have antioxidant activity. Although not well studied in humans, combined use of English ivy and other herbs or supplements with antioxidants may have additive effects.

Attribution

  • This information is based on a systematic review of scientific literature edited and peer-reviewed by contributors to the Natural Standard Research Collaboration ().

Bibliography

    Disclaimer

    Natural Standard developed the above evidence-based information based on a thorough systematic review of the available scientific articles. For comprehensive information about alternative and complementary therapies on the professional level, go to . Selected references are listed below.

  • Amara-Mokrane YA, Lehucher-Michel MP, Balansard G, et al. Protective effects of alpha-hederin, chlorophyllin and ascorbic acid towards the induction of micronuclei by doxorubicin in cultured human lymphocytes. Mutagenesis 1996;11(2):161-167.
    View Abstract
  • Billington T, Pharmawati M, Gehring CA. Isolation and immunoaffinity purification of biologically active plant natriuretic peptide. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 6-27-1997;235(3):722-725.
    View Abstract
  • Gaillard Y, Blaise P, Darre A, et al. An unusual case of death: suffocation caused by leaves of common ivy (Hedera helix). Detection of hederacoside C, alpha-hederin, and hederagenin by LC-EI/MS-MS. J Anal Toxicol 2003;27(4):257-262.
    View Abstract
  • Garcia M, Fernandez E, Navarro JA, et al. Allergic contact dermatitis from Hedera helix L. Contact Dermatitis 1995;33(2):133-134.
    View Abstract
  • Gulcin I, Mshvildadze V, Gepdiremen A, et al. Antioxidant activity of saponins isolated from ivy: alpha-hederin, hederasaponin-C, hederacolchiside-E and hederacolchiside-F. Planta Med 2004;70(6):561-563.
    View Abstract
  • Guo R, Pittler MH, Ernst E. Herbal medicines for the treatment of COPD: a systematic review. Eur Respir J 2006;28(2):330-338.
    View Abstract
  • Hofmann D, Hecker M, Volp A. Efficacy of dry extract of ivy leaves in children with bronchial asthma–a review of randomized controlled trials. Phytomedicine 2003;10(2-3):213-220.
    View Abstract
  • Johnke H, Bjarnason B. [Contact dermatitis allergy to common ivy (Hedera helix L.)]. Ugeskr Laeger 6-20-1994;156(25):3778-3779.
    View Abstract
  • Jors E. [The prevalence of skin and mucosal symptoms in gardeners handling Ficus benjamina (weeping fig) and Hedera helix (ivy). A cross-sectional study]. Ugeskr Laeger 9-8-2003;165(37):3526-3529.
    View Abstract
  • Massmanian A, Valcuende Cavero F, Ramirez Bosca A, et al. Contact dermatitis from variegated ivy (Hedera helix subsp. canariensis Willd.). Contact Dermatitis 1988;18(4):247-248.
    View Abstract
  • Oka K, Saito F, Yasuhara T, et al. The allergens of Dendropanax trifidus Makino and Fatsia japonica Decne. et Planch. and evaluation of cross-reactions with other plants of the Araliaceae family. Contact Dermatitis 1999;40(4):209-213.
    View Abstract
  • Ozdemir C, Schneider LA, Hinrichs R, et al. [Allergic contact dermatitis to common ivy (Hedera helix L.)]. Hautarzt 2003;54(10):966-969.
    View Abstract
  • Taylor P. Healthy household hints. STEP Perspect 1999;99(3):16.
    View Abstract
  • Villani P, Orsiere T, Sari-Minodier I, et al. [In vitro study of the antimutagenic activity of alphahederin]. Ann Biol Clin (Paris) 2001;59(3):285-289.
    View Abstract
  • Yesudian PD, Franks A. Contact dermatitis from Hedera helix in a husband and wife. Contact Dermatitis 2002;46(2):125-126.
    View Abstract